One of the Lucky

Yes, yes. I realize my blog has been dormant (or shall we say fallow?) for quite some time now. No need for me to go into that; if you want to know why you can read this.

But things have been improving over here in my snowy neck of the woods. Since September I’ve followed a whole food, plant-based diet (WFPB), and the results have been extreme and miraculous. Does that mean I’m cured? Nope. Right now my hands are swollen and painful, my knees and ankles ache, and my Raynaud’s is flaring because I dared to have fun outside with my kids. But man, the difference between now and pre-September is astounding and life changing and God-given. But this isn’t a post about that. It’s a post about equity in the world of chronic illness.

Over time I’ve realized ways to work around common problems encountered when living with illness and pain: Jar openers, “grabbers,” a really good cane, my Sleep Number bed, Daily Harvest, not working, having a housekeeper, my WFPB vegan diet, and a number of other things I won’t bore you with here.

Perhaps you’ve already noted that these are not inexpensive work-arounds. Me writing a blog post recommending these things to others is akin to Sheryl Sandberg telling minimum wage female employees of color they should simply lean in.

The truth is, there are Rohingya women with lupus (and men, but I will say women). There are women with lupus working physically intense and demanding jobs. There are women with lupus who are single-parenting, living in abusive relationships, a cardboard box, or facing the prospect of homelessness.

Women with lupus who are at this very moment seeking asylum, living in refugee camps, or going without life-saving medication because of the government shutdown.

I may bemoan what this illness has done to my life, but the truth is, I am one of the lucky ones.

Today I promise to count my blessings, pray for those suffering, and give thanks for all that I have. Please hold me to it.

 

 

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2 thoughts on “One of the Lucky

  1. Same here, Jamie. I’ve lived with multiple sclerosis for over 15 years, but I’ve always had access to medicine, good doctors, times of rest, and plenty of encouragement and support. I’m also blessed with a job that allows me to work from home when I need it and an understanding boss who shows me so much grace. I am well aware of my blessings, and I deeply desire to help women who are fighting MS without the privileges I enjoy.

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    • Hi Jamie,
      I’m so glad to hear that despite the challenges you face with MS that you’ve been able to gather strong support around you. When it comes to chronic illness, that support changes everything! I’m also happy to hear of your desire to help others who aren’t so fortunate. Even in the midst of your own battle, you’re thinking of helping others fight their own. We need more people willing to do that!

      Like

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